How to Make My Sentences Sound Better | 123Read&Write

As shown in an earlier post, a sentence following correct English grammar must consist of two parts: a subject and a predicate. However, as a writer, if you only stuck to that simple rule, your writing would become very bland and boring. Look below to see my point:

sentences

I. Add Some Life to Your Sentence

The game ended. It rained. I'm sad.

Above, you have three grammatically correct sentences. Each has a subject and a predicate. However, when that's all you ever use, your writing tends to sound like a grocery list. As a writer, there are a few tactics you can utilize to improve your sentences.

1. Add a Prepositional Phrase

The game ended, in the 4th inning.

2. Add an Adverb and/or Adjective

It rained incredibly hard.

3. Add a Conjunction and an Independent Clause

I'm sad, because I love to watch baseball games.

There are numerous ways to write a better sentence. As shown above, by adding some simple parts of speech, we were able to turn our simple, yet boring sentences into something much more descriptive.

The game ended, in the 4th inning. It rained incredibly hard. I'm sad, because I love to watch baseball games.

II. Make Sure Your Subject and Verb Agree!

It's important to remember that your subjects and verbs in a sentence agree. This means that if you have a singular subject, you must also have a singular verb, etc. 

Remember: Nouns ending in s or es are usually plural, and verbs ending in s are many times singular.

Look below at an example for a singular subject and verb agreement.

Look below at an example for a plural subject and verb agreement.


III. Avoid Double Negatives

When you use two negative words together within the same sentence, you have formed a double negative, which is not proper English grammar. A double negative can also occur when using contractions ending in n't along with a negative word (i.e. can't hardly). 

Negative Words = nothing, neither, never, not, none, nowhere, nobody, hardly

Negative Contractions = hadn't, didn't, wouldn't, couldn't, shouldn't, won't, can't, don't

Incorrect Writing Using Double Negatives

We cannot go nowhere we want to.

Correct Writing Not Using Double Negatives

We cannot go anywhere we want to.